Events & Activities

Mask requirements are subject to change based on CDC guidelines. At this time, masks are recommended for everyone, and required for those who are unvaccinated or who are attending as part of a group or meeting.

The Salem Museum’s Speaker Series is usually held on the second Thursday of the month. For the foreseeable future, our speakers will be on Zoom.

For Zoom Meetings: Please remember to mute yourself when you join our Zoom meetings.  We will be recording our session, so please turn off your video if you don’t want to be recorded. Your best view will be Speaker View, not Gallery View. Put questions in the chat and our speaker will answer them after the talk.

Did you miss our talk?
Speaker Series: The 200 Year History of the Preston Place,
The Oldest Existing Home in Salem, VA
CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

The Preston Place is believed to be the oldest existing home in Salem, Virginia, with two centuries of stories to tell. Alex Burke, the Salem Museum’s assistant director, relates the history of the home and the families who have lived there, as well as the Salem Historical Society’s restoration efforts.

Speaker Series:
350 years ago: Batts and Fallam meet the Totera
CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO!

On September 9, 1671, the first Europeans to explore Southwest Virginia reached the Roanoke Valley. On September 9, 2021, Thomas Klatka, archaeologist with the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, described the Virginia they discovered and the Virginia Indians they encountered.

Speaker Series/ Virtual Field Trip:
Roanoke Island: What’s Lost, What’s Found
CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO!

Roanoke Island, on the North Carolina coast, has been the dramatic setting for more than four centuries of history, including the site of the well-known “Lost Colony” of 1587. As visitors sometimes confuse the Roanoke Valley of Virginia with Roanoke Island, the Salem Museum sponsored a virtual talk and field trip to learn the story of this very different Roanoke. Josh Nelson, a National Park Ranger at the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site which includes Roanoke Island, was the featured speaker and tour guide.

Speaker Series:
Walking the Red Line: Residential Discrimination in Twentieth-Century Roanoke
CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO!

Roanoke College senior Hunter Haskins as he addresses redlining, the organization that enabled it, and more in a brief history of Roanoke’s residential segregation. Haskins defines redlining, a discriminatory practice wherein loans, insurance, and other public services were denied to residents of neighborhoods based upon the area’s ethnic or racial makeup, and how the federal government facilitated this practice in Roanoke’s very own communities.